Feminist Political Economy Network (FEM PEN) Launch

Interest in establishing an interdisciplinary feminist political economy network in the UK has been expressed at several recent events, including the 2013 SGIR/EISA conference held in Warsaw in September 2013 (which featured a 9-panel section on Feminist Global Political Economy) and the postgraduate conference held during the same month on Gender, Neoliberalism, and Financial Crisis at the University of York.

The tremendous success of these events has made it clear that the most recent global financial crisis has created an opening for renewed discussions about the complex and multifaceted ways in which gender relations are being conditioned by, and in turn condition, politico-economic processes within the UK and globally.

Building on the momentum of these one-off events, the goal of FEM-PEN is to facilitate a more sustained conversation among feminist political economists within the UK by creating opportunities for academics and practitioners to develop and present new projects and research. In so doing, it will also build links across institutions and facilitate collaboration among scholars interested in the shifting terrain of gendered political economy.

To join the mailing list, please email sac525@york.ac.uk

For more information on the group: Fem Pen Group description

For a list of upcoming events: Fem Pen upcoming events

Post-conference follow up

Hello all, the conference took place last Friday and was a great success!

There are so many people to thank here: Thanks to paper givers and participants for travelling great distances to share your research with everyone. Thanks to Diane Elson, Ruth Pearson, and Sylvia Walby for excellent and thought-provoking keynote speeches. Thanks to our funders for their support, without which the conference could not happen. Thanks finally to the volunteers from York who helped to make the day run smoothly and to Lisa Webster and Caroline Carfrae from the York Politics Department for their support and know-how. Thanks to all of you for your efforts and support.

Note: For those who presented papers, please send me a copy if you’d like me to circulate it to other participants.

Conference tomorrow!

Hello everyone! The conference begins tomorrow at 9am. Just a few pieces of information to help you find the venue:

1. From the train station, take the bus 44 to Heslington East

2. On the Heslington East campus, follow the signs to the Ron Cooke Hub

3. You’ll see our registration desk in the atrium

4. There will be plenty of volunteers around (they have name badges with green stickers)- they can help you with everything!

5. If you get lost and need help, please call or text Sydney at 07948706188

Looking forward to seeing everyone tomorrow. Safe travels!

Some final updates…

Hello all! The conference is rapidly approaching… here are some final updates for you.

1. Directions to the conference venue:

From the train station/ city center: Catch the 44 bus to the Heslington East campus. There are a few stops for this campus so you will have a few chances. The campus is well signposted and we will have some volunteers at the bus stop to help you find the Ron Cooke Hub. Once you’re in the Ron Cooke Hub, the registration table will be in the atrium. Volunteers will be wearing green name badges so feel free to ask them for anything you need.

By car: Please see http://www.york.ac.uk/hub/directions/ for driving directions and parking instructions.

From the Heslington West campus you can catch the free shuttle bus to the Heslington East campus (or it’s a 15 minute walk between campuses).

Map for GNFC Conference: https://mapsengine.google.com/map/edit?mid=zmtZFRw7kVhk.kftPLC0yq0f0

2. Conference dinner: you can register on the day for the conference dinner. Please bring £20 (cash only) and sign up for the dinner at the registration table when you arrive. Vegetarian options are available.

3. Contact information: if you get lost or need help finding the venue, please don’t hesitate to text or call me at 07948706188.

4. Arrival time: Registration opens at 9am and the first keynote will begin at 9:30am. The full programme is available here and you’ll receive a paper copy on the day: Programme PDF (Updated 8 September)

Hope everyone has a nice journey to York and I look forward to meeting you in a few weeks! -Sydney

Last day to buy tickets

Today is the last day to buy tickets! Ticket sales (at £10 each) will end tomorrow at noon. Late tickets (£25) will be available for purchase from tomorrow afternoon for another week. 

Really happy to say we’ve had such a great response. Altogether we’ll have almost 50 participants at the conference from across the world. I’ll be putting the programme together in the next few weeks, so check back for that at the end of August. 

There have been some updates with the accommodation options so please check the Accommodation tab for a range of options in York (B&Bs, hostels, hotels, etc.) Unfortunately on-campus accommodation is already full, but there are plenty of nice & affordable places to stay in the city. 

Feminist Economics Syllabus

Sydney:

An excellent resource for feminist economists, will definitely be of interest to conference participants!

Originally posted on Lady Economist:

16501553-abstract-word-cloud-for-feminist-economics-with-related-tags-and-termsFeminist economics is a thing, which some non-economists are incredulous about when I tell them that is what I do. I’ve written about it a little bit on Lady Economist, but it’s always worth expanding on. Many economists might also write it off as fringe or not serious enough, but this is a whole other can of worms. When I describe it to people, I usually say that it is twofold. First, feminist economics seeks to understand the way in which gender shapes the economy and people’s economic experiences. A classic example of this would be the study of the genderwagegap. And second, feminist economics also explores the way in which gendered thinking influences the study and methodology of economics itself. Economics tends to be very masculine, not only the proportion of men in the field, but also in the way “good” economic theory is judged…

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